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Where HERproject Works

The map below illustrates where HERproject works around the world. The dots represent countries where we implement workplace-based programs—click on them for more information about our local partners and activities. The map below illustrates active HERproject projects around the world. Click on the dots in the map for more information on each location.

Active Countries

HERhealth

HERfinance

Bangladesh

An estimated five million people work in the Ready Made Garment (RMG) sector in Bangladesh, which represents 13% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and more than 75% of the country’s total exports. Women make up 85% of this employee population. Female employees in the garment sector in Bangladesh face particular risks. Young women often start work at the age of 18 and usually continue until they are 30 to 35 years old. Female workers in Bangladesh tend to have very little education as they drop out of school early to help support their families, and some are illiterate.

Local Partners

Change Associates (HERproject country management), Awaj Foundation (Dhaka), Phulki (Dhaka), MAMATA (Chittagong)

Programs

HERhealth

Brazil

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Local Partners

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Programs

HERfinance launching in 2014

Cambodia

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Local Partners

BetterWork manages HERproject in Cambodia

Programs

HERhealth

China

China has a huge migrant population of about 200 million of which more than 60% are female workers. A few of these women have high school education, but most have only completed middle school. The majority of women are between the ages of 21 and 35 years. Increasing numbers of female factory workers are choosing to remain single longer because of their years spent working in factories away from their home towns.

Local Partners

BSR is the implementing partner for HERhealth China

Programs

HERhealth

Egypt

Women represent approximately 43% of all industrial workers in Egypt, primarily working in the textile and food-processing sectors. The majority of female workers are between the ages of 18 and25 and are unmarried. In a 2009 HERproject survey of female workers in Egypt, we found that women on average began working in the factory at the age of 19 and remained for an average of three years.

Local Partners

Egyptian Family Planning Association, Center for Development Services*
*Former BSR partner

Programs

HERhealth

Ethiopia

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Local Partners

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Programs

HERhealth launching in 2014

Haiti

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Local Partners

Local Partner: Share Hope

Programs

HERhealth

India

India’s textile industry contributes about 4% to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and directly employs over 35 million people, making it the second largest provider of employment after agriculture. The majority of people employed in Indian garment factories, especially in the south, are women between the ages of 18 and 35. These women tend to have little schooling and are often untrained when they begin working in factories. They typically work until the age of 45 and then retire. Female factory workers often do not have the time to tend to their own needs as they are burdened with long working days and commutes as well as home responsibilities.

Local Partners

Local Partner HERhealth: St. John's Medical College (Bangalore), PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research (Tiurpur), Swasti (Delhi), Selvi Memorial Illam Society*
*Former BSR Partner

Local Partner HERfinance: Sanchayan Society (Delhi), Swasti (Bangalore)

Programs

HERhealth, HERfinance

Indonesia

Indonesia’s garment and apparel sector employs approximately 1.3 million people, making it a significant contributor to the country’s economy. Approximately 78% of the workers in the sector are women.

Local Partners

Local Partner HERhealth: Yayasan Balita Sehat (YBS) - Foundation for Mother and Child Health (FMCH) (Jakarta)

Programs

HERhealth

HERfinance launching in 2014

Kenya

The cut flower, fruit, vegetable, and tea sectors are major export industries in Kenya, with flower exports alone accounting for nearly half of the country’s export earnings. Horticulture and floriculture are also significant employers of women—women represent 75% of employees in the industry. Despite their strong presence in the sector and the access to semi-secure jobs it affords, low-income women working in export-oriented agriculture face significant health challenges, including HIV/AIDS, limited access to family planning, and high maternal mortality, particularly related to illegal abortions. In addition, gender-based violence, including female genital mutilation, remains widespread.

Local Partners

National Organization of Peer Educators (NOPE) (Nairobi)

HERhealth is also supporting two smallholder tea cooperatives

Programs

HERhealth

Mexico

Mexico is firmly established as a middle-income country. It has the highest per capita income in Latin America, but it still faces huge gaps between rich and poor, north and south, urban and rural. At 47.5%, the female labor force participation rate is twenty points lower in Mexico than in comparable countries in Latin America. Women in Mexican society have traditionally served as the principal family caretakers, and have only recently begun working outside the home. In fact, the majority of factory workers in Mexico are young women in their late teens or early twenties and represent a population with great familial pressures, but also tremendous potential.

Local Partners

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Programs

HERfinance launching 2014

Myanmar

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Local Partners

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Programs

HERhealth launching in 2014

Pakistan

Textile and clothing industries are a major contributor to incomes for Pakistan, representing 15% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The clothing sector is the single largest source of industrial employment in the country. The female labor participation rate is low, and women comprise a minority of the workforce in the sector (30%). Female workers face a myriad of health issues in Pakistan, including poor hygiene, nutrition, and maternal care, as well as domestic violence in a male-dominated society.

Local Partners

HANDS (Karachi and Lahore), Aga Khan University*
*Former BSR partner

Programs

HERhealth

Vietnam

The majority of the two million garment industry workers are women from rural areas of the Mekong Delta, Red River Delta, and north-central Vietnam. According to a survey conducted by Better Work Vietnam and Tufts University, the average garment factory workforce is nearly 82% female. Additionally, half the workers interviewed were under the age of 25 and 75% were under 30, an unsurprising statistic given Vietnam’s low median age of 28 (compared to 36 in China).

Local Partners

Centre for Promotion of Quality of Life (Life Centre) (Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi, and surrounding provinces)

Programs

HERhealth

HERproject is Generously Supported by

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation C&A Foundation GAIN Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands Takeda The Walt Disney Company UK Government What Works

HERproject Company Participants


HERproject Mission

To unlock the full potential of women working in global supply chains through workplace programs promoting health, financial inclusion, and gender equality. Download an overview of HERproject. Download an overview of HERproject.

About BSR

BSR is a global nonprofit organization that works with its network of more than 250 member companies and other partners to build a just and sustainable world. From its offices in Asia, Europe, and North America, BSR develops sustainable business strategies and solutions through consulting, research, and cross-sector collaboration. Visit www.bsr.org for more information about BSR’s 25 years of leadership in sustainability.